News

Open Data Improves Lives

In case you missed it on Sunday, the New York Times had a great article on the importance of government-published open data and its benefits to business and community. The article, by Richard H. Thaler of the Booth School of Business at the University of Chicago, singled out the pioneering efforts of San Francisco’s government and developers:

For some years, Bay Area transit systems had been tracking the locations of their trains and buses via onboard GPS. Then someone got the bright idea to post that information in real time. Thus the delightful app Routesy was born. Install it on a smartphone and the app can tell you that your bus is stuck in traffic and will be 10 minutes late — or it can help you realize that you are standing on the wrong street, dummy. It gives consumers a great new way to find out when and where the bus is coming, and all at minimal government expense.

Find the full Times article here, and check out DataSF for more good bits. 

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Gov 2.0, News, Public Participation

Join Us for CityCampSF!

CityCamp is a global movement of informal conferences bringing together neighborhood and nonprofit leaders and activists, entrepreneurs and technology developers, new media and traditional journalists, and municipal employees to brainstorm, teach, learn and plan how to promote civic engagement and improve our cities with emerging technologies.

CityCampSF on Saturday, October 16, is a free event driven by participants and attendees. At this event, we’ll be forming action plans for how we can improve San Francisco neighborhoods and governance in 2011, from social media to crime reporting to urban farming and public space.

San Francisco is an early leader in open government, Gov 2.0 and government social media, and a hotbed for civic entrepreneurs and innovative startups (see the DataSF App Showcase). At CityCampSF, we’ll be moving from organizing to action, forming working groups for real projects to better our neighborhoods and City Hall.

Today, you can suggest and vote on topics for CityCampSF, and you can register here for the free event (space is limited to the first 125 signups).

– Adriel Hampton

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