News

SF Launches SFFireApp.org to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival Rates

SFFD Chief Joanne Hayes-White, City Attorney Dennis Herrera, SF Paramedic Assn. CEO Arthur Hsieh, Code for America's Jennifer Pahlka

In a great example of Gov 2.0 collaboration in action, City Attorney Dennis Herrera (I work in the City Attorney’s Office as an investigator) and Fire Chief Joanne Hayes-White today announced SFFireApp.org, an effort to increase sudden cardiac arrest survival rates in San Francisco. The initiative seeks to successfully implement innovative mobile technology developed through the San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District and released in the SF East Bay for the iPhone in late January.

Visit SFFireApp.org to learn more and get involved.

San Francisco became the first large municipality to publicly commit to implement the “Fire Department” application, which links CPR-trained volunteers, AED maps and smartphone users in an effort to save lives in the first few minutes after cardiac arrest. Last year, only 10 percent of sudden cardiac arrest victims in SF survived to admission in the hospital. The initiative may also save public health dollars by reducing injury to survivors.

“San Ramon has less than 100 sudden cardiac arrests a year, and for this application to have a meaningful impact on society we need to extend it to larger jurisdictions,” said SRVFPD Chief Richard Price. “We are extremely pleased to be partnering with San Francisco today to extend this life-saving tool to the city as soon as possible.”

City Attorney’s Office press release.

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Gov 2.0, News, Public Participation

An Avatar Picture Worth 1,000 Friends

Do default avatar pictures bother you, or you still shrinking back from showing the world your pearly whites or using an agency logo on a consumer-oriented social media site?

It’s often surprising how many new social media users fail to update their generic avatars when starting out. And failing to do so is likely to be a major setback for effective use of social media tools. A study earlier this year by marketing firm HubSpot looked at 9 million Twitter accounts and found that accounts with profile pictures had 10 times as many followers as account with generic avatar images.

Most social sites make putting up a picture part of the sign-up process, others, like government-focused social network GovLoop on the Ning platform, have an approval process before you can upload a photo. Sadly, one look at GovLoop’s members tab tells you that most people aren’t bothering with that second step. But for 10 times the contacts, it seems like social media suicide not to do so.

Not everyone is comfortable putting up their picture on a social site, and there are plenty of other ways to dress up your avatar without. This article from Mashable talks about creative avatar images, and just about any creative picture is a lot better than the default images, such as the Twitter egg shown here.

For the San Francisco City Attorney’s Office on Twitter, we used a classic mug shot of City Attorney Dennis Herrera, top right (smiling in your picture also means more friends, studies have shown), and a custom background with our agency logo and a little blackbird. The simple custom background is fairly popular, eliciting responses like those of local journalist Lois Beckett, “How could Twitter bird + formal seal not be awesome?”

Hopefully this gives you some ideas on how to put your best foot – er, face – forward in open government social media efforts.

– Adriel Hampton

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Gov 2.0, News, Public Participation

‘The Twitter SF Officials Daily’

If you’re using Twitter, you’ve probably already been exposed to Paper.li, the site that allows anyone to create daily Twitter newspaper based on lists of Twitter members. It’s a very nice tool, and one we’re now using in the City Attorney’s Office to create a daily update from links and photos shared by more than three dozen San Francisco officials and agencies we follow.

The daily “paper” provides a quick overview of all the stories shares by SF gov, from news stories to official press releases. Today’s edition, for example, has stories on the San Bruno fire and ultra-high-speed Internet, news of initiatives and field work by Mayor Gavin Newsom and State Sen. Mark Leno, photos from Department of Works official Mohammed Nuru, and a contest and a survey from the Public Utilities Commission.

You can check out the SF Officials Daily here, and let us know if your city has one – we’d love to check it out.

– Adriel Hampton

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Gov 2.0, News, Public Participation

Check Out How SF Gov Stacks Up on Twitter

More than three dozen San Francisco officials, agencies and programs are active on Twitter, using the microblogging tool to broadcast messages, interact with citizens and even accept service requests.

The SF City Attorney’s Office is highly active on Twitter, and in this spreadsheet we’ve put together, you can check out various City and County of San Francisco Twitter efforts, from how many folks each account is following to what percentage of tweets are conversational. (The analysis does not include SF officials that link their Twitter profile to campaign sites, or accounts that have been inactive more than a few months.)

You can follow the City Attorney’s Office on Twitter here, and also connect with the City Attorney’s Office on Flickr. Also, check out our daily Twitter newspaper made up of SF officials’ tweets.

– Adriel Hampton

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Gov 2.0, News, Public Participation

San Francisco City Attorney’s Office on Flickr

Of late, I’ve been been using the photo sharing site Flickr more and more, shifting my focus from researching its 4 billion images to uploading fresh content and networking through the site. Flickr has tremendous functionality for creating blog content and populating other social media platforms as well. I’ve got a recent post about using Flickr in a broader content strategy, and Dan Slee of UK local gov’t has a great guide called “Social Photo: 11 groovy ways Flickr can be used by local government.”

One of the great local government examples we’ve looked at is the Flickr activity of the Washington State Department of Transportation, managed by Jeremy Bertrand. Today, we opened an official Flickr account for the San Francisco City Attorney’s Office, where we hope to not only highlight our great city, but also feature photos that illustrate the work of our office, from the hard-fought battle for marriage equality, to City Attorney Dennis Herrera’s anti-gang initiatives.

If you are a San Francisco photographer, or just interested in connecting with our content and San Francisco favorites, please add us on Flickr. We also welcome suggestions on how you think we can best use this channel.

– Adriel Hampton

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